Akhenaten and nefertiti relationship to tut

King Tut's Family

akhenaten and nefertiti relationship to tut

Scans looking for Queen Nefertiti inside King Tut's tomb Akhenaten and Nefertiti ruled together during a tumultuous time in religion. She was the principal wife of Akhenaten, Tut's father. Tut's family ties are further complicated by the royal custom of incest during this period. Rather, it could be due to three successive generations of marriage "I believe that Tutankhamun is the son of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, but that.

  • King Tut, The Boy King
  • Turning to the Aten
  • Heir to an empire

Evidence has revealed the presence of an infection in the broken leg and Tut's immune system may have been unable to fight it. Rather than keeping the royal bloodline pure, as the ancient Egyptians thought, incest resulted in defective genes and many deformities. King Tut's parents were brother and sister, and his wife was his half-sister.

akhenaten and nefertiti relationship to tut

The union of Tut and his wife produced only two children, both stillborn girls. Tut's life as pharaoh was tumultuous and filled with intrigue. Although experts now speculate that Tut may have died from malaria, historically, the assumption has been that he was murdered. Images of her that have survived indicate that she was a beautiful young woman without the deformities and ailments that plagued her brother.

Both Ankhesenamun and Tut shared the same father, but Ankhesenamen's mother was the beautiful Queen Nefertiti. Like Tut, her tumultuous life was very brief and her death is uncertain.

Akhenaten: Egyptian Pharaoh, Nefertiti's Husband, Tut's Father

She and Tut married when he ascended the throne and were together until his death. After Tut died, Ankhesenamun was informed that she was to marry her grandfather, which was a political move on his part.

Ankhesenamun sent a letter to the Hittite King Suppiluliuma I, requesting that he send a son for her to marry because she was afraid of her grandfather. The Hittite King acceded to her request, sending his son Prince Zannanza to her, but the prince was murdered at the Egyptian border and never reached her. The marriage to her grandfather apparently took place but Ankhesenamun disappeared during his reign, between about BC and BC.

Since no evidence of her mummy or tomb has ever been found, historians postulate that she was murdered and her body disposed of.

Akhenaten: Egyptian Pharaoh, Nefertiti's Husband, Tut's Father

Ankhesenamun was briefly married to her father, King Akhenatenbut no children were produced, and she was married to her father's co-regent, Smenkhkare, for a brief period. She also had a name change during her lifetime, her birth name was Ankhesenpaaten and later it was changed to the more well known Ankhesenamun. His radical religious beliefs were forced upon his subjects through use of the Egyptian army.

King Tut’s mother, White Queen Nefertiti

All the old gods were destroyed and the capital was moved from Thebes to the new city of Amarna. August 30, Its location was chosen so that its sunrise conveyed a symbolic meaning. History, Fantasy and Ancient Egypt" Routledge, He notes that this capital would quickly grow to become about 4. Akhenaten, either before or shortly after he became pharaoh, would marry Nefertiti, who in some works of art is shown standing equal next to her husband.

akhenaten and nefertiti relationship to tut

Some have even speculated that she may have become a co- or even sole, ruler of Egypt. During their rule, Egypt ruled an empire that stretched from Syria, in west Asia, to the fourth cataract of the Nile River in modern-day Sudan. They note that while previous Egyptian kings would likely have launched a military expedition into west Asia as a result of these acts, Akhenaten appears to have done nothing.

akhenaten and nefertiti relationship to tut

Montserrat notes that at Karnaka temple complex near Luxor that was devoted to Amun-Ra, the king would have a series of Aten temples built, their construction beginning perhaps in his very first year of rule. Even at this early stage, he appeared to have a dim view of the god Amun, whom Karnak was dedicated to. Montserrat notes that the axis of the new Aten complex was built facing to the east, toward the rising sun, whereas the rest of Karnak is oriented towards the west, where ancient Egyptians believed the underworld to be.

King Tut's Family

Egyptologist James Allen notes in his book "Middle Egyptian: Archaeologist Barry Kemp, who leads modern-day excavations at the site of Amarna, notes in his book "The City of Akhenaten and Nefertiti" Thames and Hudson, that researchers have found figures depicting other deities, such as Bes and Thoth, at Amarna.

Grotesque art In addition to his radical religious changes, Akhenaten also unleashed a revolution in the way art was drawn. Before his time Egyptian art, especially those portraying royalty, tended to show a stiff, structured, formal style.