Shmuel and brunos relationship trust

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas: Friendship by Grace 8F on Prezi

How would you describe the relationship between Bruno and Gretel? II. Bruno is more interested in bonds than differences, and looks for loyalty, trust, and. Shmuel is Bruno's dream come true: He's a kid, a good listener, and he has the he still fundamentally trusts this little German boy who knows nothing about the. Lonely Bruno longs to explore the forbidden world around him and, in some parallel existence divided by tall wired walls, Bruno meets Shmuel.

Although Bruno doesn't realize that the people on the other side of the fence are Jews until close to the end of the novel, he's grown-up hearing propaganda about Germany being the best.

How could he not with a Nazi commandant as a father and slews of soldiers alwayshanging around? This is a kid who's literally had Hitler in his house. Questions About Race 1. Is it believable that Bruno does not know if he is Jewish or not? Use the text to support your answer. Do you think Gretel can be considered anti-semitic? Again, turn to the book for evidence.

Why do you think Shmuel never talks about being Jewish? For such a young boy, Bruno has an impressively strong and sound sense of morality and ethics in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

We don't think it comes from his father a Naziso we can only assume he gets it from the female figures in his life his mother and grandmother. Bruno, unlike many Nazis, does not view anyone else in his life as less or subhuman.

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas - ‘I’m a Jew’ (HD) - Vera Farmiga, Asa Butterfield - MIRAMAX

That includes the help—Maria and Pavel—and of course Shmuel, who is Jewish. Bruno is more interested in bonds than differences, and looks for loyalty, trust, and kindness in people—qualities found in any good human being, no matter their race or class. Questions about Morality and Ethics 1. Who do you think teaches Bruno the difference between right and wrong? How do you know? Would you say that Bruno's father is a bad man? Use the text for evidence. Does anyone try to explain to Bruno why Jewish people are put in concentration camps?

Point to evidence in the text. When Bruno is forced to leave Berlin in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, one of his main complaints is that he also has to leave his three best friends. To make matters worse, when he gets to the new house in Auschwitz, there are no other families or children around. Ugh—so long, social life.

When he meets Shmuel, though, a kid on the other side of the fence, it's the beginning of a beautiful—albeit short-lived—friendship. Despite their many differences, these two form a bond that transcends race, and even fences—so much so, that when asked if he still wants to go back to Berlin, Bruno confidently says no. In a world governed by hatred, Bruno and Shmuel show that friendship can thrive even in darkness.

Questions About Friendship 1. What is Bruno's first reaction to Shmuel? How does his understanding of Shmuel change over time? What do Bruno and Shmuel have in common? What is different about them? Do you think Bruno would be friends with Shmuel if there were children on his side of the fence?

Why do you think Gretel is okay with not having any friends? What makes her different from Bruno in that sense? Both are in places they were forced to go to, and both can't leave. Of course the gigantic difference is that Shmuel is in a concentration camp and Bruno is in a house. Shmuel is drastically confined—first to his house, then to a shared room, then a train, and eventually in Auschwitz. Bruno, however, has the freedom to walk out of his house when he wants and does not fear for his life.

In their confinement, though, both boys struggle with loneliness. And in the unlikely friendship they form, they both find a bit of freedom from their isolation. Now if you'll excuse us, someone must be cutting onions in the vicinity. Questions about Freedom and Confinement 1.

How does Bruno's confinement in Auschwitz differ from that of Shmuel's? Don't limit yourself to physical differences—use the text to dig into emotional and psychological differences, too. Would you say that Bruno lives in a sort of prison? What do you make of Bruno giving up his freedom to join Shmuel on his side of the fence?

What is the author trying to say with this? Do you believe Shmuel ever has a chance at freedom? And yet, when it comes to Bruno, our main character, there's only one instance in which he confront mortality: While warfare isn't particularly visible on Bruno's side of the fence, on Shmuel's side, it's a totally different story. Shmuel's mother's "taken away," his grandfather "disappears," and then one day, his father doesn't come back from work.

When your entire people are systematically under attack, it's safe to say that war is being waged against you—which is exactly the case for Shmuel and the other prisoners held in Auschwitz. Questions About Warfare The Holocaust 1. How are the boys and men described who live on the other side of the fence?

How about on Bruno's side? How would you describe the relationship between Bruno and Gretel? She feels annoyed by Bruno but does love him a lot even if it does not appear like it. Just like the whole family they are not united but are the ones that speak the most with each other in the family. In Bruno's family, lies and deception are why he doesn't know what's going on around him.

When he asks his mom why they're moving, for instance, she just says it's for his dad's "important" job. When he asks who the people in the striped pajamas are, his father says they're "not people. In the end, all the lies lead to Bruno lying about where he goes and what he does in his free time—so while we can't be totally sure, it seems possible that with more transparency in his family, Bruno might have met a different end in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

Questions about Lies and Deceit 1. Bruno and his grandmother are the only ones who question the status quo. Using the text, explain why each of them is willing to do so. What similarities do you notice?

How about key differences? The war is a topic that is almost never mentions only behind closed doors the whole family seems to understand but nobody has ever sat down with Bruno to talk about it. They both seem to be weirded out by it but stay away from it, try to not cause too much trouble. Both know it is a very important job even though it is not the best job, and dislike whatever he is doing, Bruno for taking off time of his father and grandmother because of the horrible thing he does to innocent people.

Bruno's mom lies to him about what his dad does for a living. Why does she do this? Remember to look beyond this moment in the book to formulate your answer. Because she knows Bruno is too young to understand what the war is about and does not want his son having the same mindset that father has because she hates what her husband is doing for a living and what he believes in. She may find it hard to explain too and may think that Bruno only needs to understand it is an important job and may not want him to know the horrors his father job involves.

Does anyone not lie in this book? If so, who and why not? If not, what does this tell you? Also, the grandmother tends to tell the father what she honestly thinks of his job, that she thinks it is wrong and an atrocity, she knows its an important job and so does the whole family but most of the family lies even though they hate his job II.

Even though the subject is hardly talked about in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, race is everywhere in this book since it was a major player in the Holocaust—though there were many others, Jewish people were a primary target for the Nazis.

In our story, the defining difference between Bruno and Shmuel is that Shmuel is Jewish. Although Bruno doesn't realize that the people on the other side of the fence are Jews until close to the end of the novel, he's grown-up hearing propaganda about Germany being the best. How could he not with a Nazi commandant as a father and slews of soldiers always hanging around? This is a kid who's literally had Hitler in his house. Questions About Race 1. Is it believable that Bruno does not know if he is Jewish or not?

Use the text to support your answer. Neither he or Gretel can tell the difference between them and the Jews. He is never explained why would the Jews not be people of the enemy. What are we then? Do you think Gretel can be considered anti-semitic? Again, turn to the book for evidence.

No, we are certainly not. Why do you think Shmuel never talks about being Jewish? Because he is taught that what he is wrong and he thinks that it isnt something to be proud about since he is punished for being it. He knows that Germans are the ones that are mostly against Jews and is scared to talk about it in front of Bruno since his dad is a Nazi soldier.

He may feel uncomfortable talking about that with Bruno.

The most poignant quotes from The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

For such a young boy, Bruno has an impressively strong and sound sense of morality and ethics in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. We don't think it comes from his father a Naziso we can only assume he gets it from the female figures in his life his mother and grandmother. Bruno, unlike many Nazis, does not view anyone else in his life as less or subhuman. That includes the help—Maria and Pavel—and of course Shmuel, who is Jewish.

Bruno is more interested in bonds than differences, and looks for loyalty, trust, and kindness in people—qualities found in any good human being, no matter their race or class. Questions about Morality and Ethics 1.

Who do you think teaches Bruno the difference between right and wrong? How do you know? His mother is the one that teaches him modals mostly, how to behave with others not to judge. Would you say that Bruno's father is a bad man? Use the text for evidence. He is not bad in some way he was looking to help the greater good Germany by making it better and he truly believed that Jews made it worse, he was looking to help since he was taught that Jews were the only cause of Germany losing the first world war.

Does anyone try to explain to Bruno why Jewish people are put in concentration camps? Point to evidence in the text. You have nothing whatsoever in common with them. When Bruno is forced to leave Berlin in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, one of his main complaints is that he also must leave his three best friends. To make matters worse, when he gets to the new house in Auschwitz, there are no other families or children around.

Ugh—so long, social life. When he meets Shmuel, though, a kid on the other side of the fence, it's the beginning of a beautiful—albeit short-lived—friendship.

The most poignant quotes from The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas | Children's books | The Guardian

Despite their many differences, these two form a bond that transcends race, and even fences—so much so, that when asked if he still wants to go back to Berlin, Bruno confidently says no. In a world governed by hatred, Bruno and Shmuel show that friendship can thrive even in darkness. Questions About Friendship 1. What is Bruno's first reaction to Shmuel?

How does his understanding of Shmuel change over time? What do Bruno and Shmuel have in common? What is different about them?

The main difference is their living condition in which the two boys live, Bruno is privileged by being German, has everything he needs and more but Shmuel being Jewish has less than what a little boy would need to survive 3.

Do you think Bruno would be friends with Shmuel if there were children on his side of the fence? Probably, since Bruno likes exploring and does it with his friends they would see the fence and want to go there where they would meet Shmuel and because he is very friendly, as described in the book, they would be friends.

Why do you think Gretel is okay with not having any friends? What makes her different from Bruno in that sense? She appreciates spending time with herself. Bruno being younger likes to knows new things, explore but not alone. Both are in places they were forced to go to, and both can't leave. Of course, the gigantic difference is that Shmuel is in a concentration camp and Bruno is in a house.

Shmuel is drastically confined—first to his house, then to a shared room, then a train, and eventually in Auschwitz.